Student Post: Embracing the Golden Age of Publishing

by Rosalba Ugliuzza 

We are currently in the “Golden Age” of publishing. With the inventions and popular sales of tablets, apps, and mobile devices, this “Golden Age” is more than just holding the power of a red pen in your hand. It’s more than just the text in a book or magazine.

I grasped this knowledge after attending the “Trends in Digital Publishing” panel discussion on Monday, March 24. Moderated by director Anne Converse Willkomm, the featured panelists were some of the most extraordinary intellectuals in today’s publishing industry: digital content producer and Rosemont graduate faculty Thomas Hartmann, digital publishing consultant Scott Chappell, writer and Wild River Review social media director Don Lafferty, and Publisher’s Weekly senior news editor Calvin Reid.

I enjoyed the panel discussion so much that halfway through the seminar, I stopped taking notes so that I could absorb the words of wisdom. Their background and experiences are different yet extraordinary. They provided very insightful, informative, and thought-provoking opinions about the digital content and the future of the entire publishing industry. They took turns defining content and who owns it. On a social media outlet, you are a partial owner of what you write. Content is all around us. It’s a delivery vehicle. A book can be a combination of many things, not just a solid object.

The panelists were profoundly optimistic that change in the publishing industry is a good thing. Traditional publishers are joining the bandwagon of applying the digital aspect to their business model. Not only will digital publishing help the consumer masses grasp up-to-the-minute information with one easy touch, it will also encourage the well-rounded producers – such as authors – to come up with more than one way to publish their latest work. For example, if an author opts not to use or gets rejected by a traditional publisher, he or she can still publish work through Amazon, social media outlets, or blogs.

With the latest changes and upgrades, we must not be preoccupied or scared. Curiosity is the key to educating ourselves in order to stay on top of the publishing game.

Director’s Post: Content, the New Buzz Word

by Anne Converse Willkomm

What is content? Content is anything and everything we read and listen to online or in print. Content is the expression of thoughts, ideas, and data presented through various mediums, such as text, audio, video, animation, and graphic images. Content is created, curated, and managed. In today’s digital world, content is everything!

content blog post

Before the digital wave, content existed as text and images on a printed page. There was only one time-tested way to create the words, ideas, and images: through the author’s imagination and contribution. An author came up with an idea, an author wrote the words on the page, the words were edited into a meaningful and functional form, an author sold it to a publisher, and a publisher published it for a consumer to purchase.

Today, however, content is created and used across mediums we couldn’t conceive of 20 years ago. Sure, there are still printed books – and in my opinion, print books aren’t going away (as Stephen Fry said, “The book is no more threatened by a Kindle than stairs are threatened by an escalator.”). But today there are ebooks, websites, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, podcasts, webinars, blogs, and so much more. Every word, image, audio clip, graphic, and video is content.

In this digital age, it is incredibly easy to create content. I can set up a website in a matter of minutes. What I put on that website is content. I can upload a novella and create an ebook in minutes, too. The ability to get content into the world for the consumer – or the “target audience” – is quick and easy. However, do not confuse ability with quality, creativity, or accuracy.

Whether creating a website to promote an author or a car, those who create the content must strive for the three goals mentioned above. The creator must understand the target audience, the product/company mission, market, etc. And that content cannot be left to stagnate. Content must be continually updated so the consumer (a reader, a viewer, a listener, or an actual purchaser) has something fresh and new to consider on a regular basis.

Authors, publishers, and other companies often have dedicated content curators who gather and cultivate content that others create. This can, and often does, create authenticity. Content curation is what content managers do to drive and enhance SEO (Search Engine Optimization), which ultimately makes it easier for consumers to find a website. Managers work closely with marketing and sales teams to develop the appropriate balance of free content versus paid content. Newspaper companies forced to go digital have struggled with this dilemma.

The ease of creating content has formed new job positions and will likely create more. New issues and questions will arise: Who owns the content? Who should receive monetary compensation? Companies, such as Google, MySpace, and Sony, struggle with these legal issues. I am certain there will be more concerns regarding intellectual property and liability laws as we all struggle to define, understand, and manage content.

Event: Panel Discussion on Digital Publishing


Trends in Digital Publishing, a panel discussion with Thomas Hartman, Scott Chappell, Don Lafferty, and Calvin Reid, will be help in Rosemont College’s Lawrence Auditorium at 6:00pm on Monday, March 24. The event is free and open to the public! To register your RSVP, please click here. For any questions or concerns, contact Anne Willkomm at